Amish Cockscomb

Celosia cristata | SKU: 0834A-SLDOUT
3 Reviews
$3.75

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  • Organic
  • Annual
  • Great cut flower or bedding plant
  • Plants grow to 12 inches
  • Fuzzy red flower heads

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$3.75

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Item Details

(Celosia cristata) Given to SSE by longtime members Orral and Joan Craig who discovered it growing in an Amish garden near Arthur, Illinois. Native to the tropics and introduced to Europe in the 1570s. Fuzzy red flower heads resemble the comb of a rooster. Annual, 12" tall.

Learn to Grow Amish Cockscomb

Start Indoors: 6-8 weeks before last frost

Germination: 7-10 Days

Plant Outdoors: 12-18” Apart

Light: Sun/Partial Shade

Instructions - Sow seeds indoors just beneath the surface of the soil. Plant out into average well-drained soil after the danger of frost has passed. Good cutting flower, fresh or dried.

Ratings & Reviews

3 reviews

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GORGEOUS AMISH COCKSCOMB PLANT!!!!

by

I bought these seeds not knowing what to expect but to my surprise this plant is GORGEOUS!!!!
Neon green leaves with neon pink flowers!!!!
What contrast!!! A beauty to anyone garden!

Stunner

by

So Beautiful and eye-catching! Remained sturdy with transplanting indoor to outdoor. A large patch of these would look amazing.

Show stopper!

by

We planted this seed several years ago in our garden. It was a tremendous success. These flowers are absolutely gorgeous and unlike anything else I grow. My garden is along the road and I have had people stop to ask about these beautiful blooms. They are a long lasting cut flower and dry nicely to display all year long. But be careful of the seeds! The exterior of the flower is covered with little black seeds. I usually place a plate under my vase to catch them. Because of all these seeds, I have never had to replant these flowers. They self-seed each year - so be sure to initially plant them where you want them! Each year, I dig up many new sprouts and share them with friends.