Two Inch Strawberry Popcorn Corn

Zea mays | SKU: 1195A
3 Reviews
$3.75 to $10.95
  • Organic
  • Plants grow to 5-6 feet
  • Produces 2-4 ears per stalk
  • Strawberry shaped ears
  • Red kernels
  • Popcorn
  • 100 days
  • ±420 seeds/oz

$3.75 to $10.95

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Item Details

Small red strawberry-shaped ears are good for popping and gorgeous for fall decorations. Plants are 5-6' tall with 2-4 ears per stalk. 100 days. ±420 seeds/oz.

Learn to Grow Two Inch Strawberry Popcorn Corn

Direct Seed: 4" Apart

Germination: 4-21 Days

Rows Apart: 36-48"

Light: Full Sun

Instructions - Sow seeds outdoors 1" deep after danger of frost has passed. For good pollination and full ears, plant in blocks of 3-6 rows instead of one long row. Thin seedlings to 8" apart. Corn is a heavy feeder and does best in well-drained fertile soil with plenty of water.

Ratings & Reviews

3 reviews

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The cutest tiny popcorn kernels

by

This was such fun to grow! The kernels are tiny, so the popped corn is also tiny and cute! The kernels are sharp, so gloves make removing them easier. Next time, we're going to try popping them straight off the cobs.

Just right

by

As an organic heirloom gardener I have grown Strawberry popcorn for better 15 years.
That alone should e all you need to know butt I will add that there isn't a child nor a woman for that matter who doesn't rave!
I gave to everyone in my area be it man woman or beast and that includes the bar owner nearby who served popcorn at her bar.
Sorry your our of seed at present but will watch.
Train

Beautiful Red Kernels, Fast-Growing Mini Corn

by

I planted this corn in a food & pollinator jungle in my St. Paul, Minnesota front yard, interspersed with tomatoes, tomatillo, peppers, kale, lavender, milkweed, Jerusalem artichoke, sunflowers, and runner beans—truly a good forest jungle.

These corn grew fast: the plants were taller than “knee high by the Fourth of July” even though we had a drought this summer, and we started to harvest tiny ears of corn in late August. The dark red color of the kernels is spectacular.

We have not tried making popcorn yet but they are beautiful for decorative use.