Grandma Kirksey Pepper

Capsicum annuum | SKU: 0287A P25
2 Reviews
$3.75
  • From the Collection for 2022
  • Organic
  • Colorful fruits grow to 3/4-1 inch
  • Bushy plants have dark purple leaves and small conical peppers
  • Hot pepper
  • 100 days from transplant

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$3.75

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Item Details

This stunning ornamental pepper makes a splash in both borders and containers. Bushy plants produce a dense canopy of dark-purple leaves and myriad small, conical peppers that ripen from purple to orange to dark red. The peppers measure about 3/4" long and stand erect on the plant; they are edible but very pungent and somewhat bitter. ‘Grandma Kirksey’ is named for Willie Jane (Pulley) Kirksey, who received the variety during the Great Depression and grew the peppers in her flower beds. 100 days to ripe fruit from transplant. Hot. Organic.

Learn to Grow Grandma Kirksey Pepper

Start Indoors: 8 weeks before last frost

Germination: 14 Days

Plant Outdoors: 12-24” Apart

Light: Full Sun

Instructions - Sow seeds indoors ¼” deep. Peppers germinate best in warm soil, so gentle bottom heat may be helpful until seedlings emerge. Wait to transplant outdoors until soil is warm.

Ratings & Reviews

2 reviews

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Edible Showstopper Hot Pepper

by

One of our favorite trials that we grew this summer. Plant has interesting eggplant colored leaves and a controlled habit making it great for ornamental use. Everyone who walked into the trial area was intrigued by the plant. We had a small stake in them but they would have done fine with out it. The multicolor peppers were hot with heat that is similar to a chili pepper. They start out a beautiful lavender color and ripen to red.

Hardy, beautiful and bountiful!

by

Planted these last summer, although slow to start, they became very hardy and abundant! Strikingly beautiful dark purple leaves with purple to yellow to orange to red peppers. Reminded me of Christmas bulbs on a tree. The pepper does contain some heat but a floral note as well. Had a lot of intrigue and positive comments as I planted some as ornamental "bushes" in my front flowering garden. They produced a lot of peppers and I dried what I could not use immediately. Will be planting again this summer!