Garden Huckleberry

Solanum melanocerasum | SKU: 0622A
6 Reviews
$3.25 to $14.25
  • Organic
  • Plants grow to 3-4 feet
  • Berries grow to ¾ inch
  • Tasteless when raw and unsweetened
  • Good for freezing and canning
  • 75-80 days from transplant

$3.25 to $14.25

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Item Details

(Solanum melanocerasum) Upright 3-4' branched plants produce hundreds of ¾" purple-black berries in clusters. Best when picked after berries turn from glossy to dull black. Tasteless when raw and unsweetened; best used in mock blueberry pies and preserves. Use about 1 pound of berries to ½ cup of sugar for best flavor. Good for freezing and canning. 75-80 days from transplant.

Learn to Grow Garden Huckleberry

Start Indoors: 6 weeks before last frost

Germination: 14 Days

Plant Outdoors: 24” Apart

Light: Full Sun

Instructions - Sow seeds indoors ¼" deep. Thin seedlings when 2" tall and transplant into individual pots. Plant outdoors in rows 36" apart.

Huckleberry

by

I grew up eating wild huckleberries, raw. They were anything but tasteless. These can't be any good if they are tasteless raw.

A great jam or pie berry that produces well.

by

First year growing these. I did my research, and while I wish these were a berry my kids could eat out of the garden, they will make a very tasty jam or pie which I've heard it does wonderfully. They grew very well and produced lots of berries. Best thing was I didn't have to fuss or worry about bugs or birds eating them. My one year old and likes to eat them but I only let her have 1 because they can be toxic raw. They are in the nightshade family. It's an annual plant much like a pepper or tomato plant

Common names can be confusing, check the Species!

by

These are an old-world variant of Black Nightshade. While edible when ripe, this is why they are toxic when raw and don't have much taste. They are not closely related to what most people consider huckleberries, which are native to North America and in the heath family, and related to blueberries and bilberries.

Pay attention to the species...

by

These are not what people in North America would call huckleberries, they are an old-world relative of black nightshade, which is edible when ripe but quite a different taste from new-world huckleberries (which are related to blueberries and bilberries).

More like a nightshade

by

Grew great, but these must be a different type of huckleberry than the ones growing in Idaho. These look and taste more like nightshades. I worry a bit about using lots of them in a jam or jelly. My chickens won't eat them, which is also interesting. The other type of huckleberry looks more like a blueberry than a nightshade. Not sure i will grow these again.

Know before you grow!

by

Just an fyi- this is NOT a true huckleberry. Don't expect it to taste like a wild huckleberry. This is in the nightshade family and yes, is tasteless raw. However when you cook it and add a little sugar it tastes like a cross between a blueberry and grape- very tasty!

The plant itself is very prolific. Just do a little research on garden huckleberries aka black nightshades and enjoy!!