Dr. Wyche's Yellow Tomatillo

Physalis ixocarpa | SKU: 1412A
2 Reviews
$3.25 to $15.00
  • Organic
  • Yellow fruits with purple blush
  • Fruits grow to 1-2 inches in diameter
  • Very productive
  • 90-100 days from transplant

$3.25 to $15.00

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Item Details

Given to SSE by Suzanne Ashworth, who obtained the seeds from the late Dr. John Wyche. Unique yellow tomatillo with contrasting purple blush (1½" diameter), delicious sweet flavor. Very prolific and easy to grow. 90-100 days from transplant.

Learn to Grow Dr. Wyche's Yellow Tomatillo

Start Indoors: 6 weeks before last frost

Germination: 14 Days

Plant Outdoors: 24-36” Apart

Light: Full Sun

Instructions - Culture is very similar to tomatoes. Sow seeds indoors ¼" deep. Transplant outdoors when soil has warmed. Plants are self- supporting, but sprawl over a large area. Cage or trellis when space is limited.

Ratings & Reviews

2 reviews

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Easy to grow, good for canning

by

These took a while to get started and produce (Zone 4), but once they took off, they were very prolific. Lots of small (1-2 inch) fruits, great flavor and quality. The husk forms first and then the fruit grows into the husk over time. They needed lots of supports - even my largest tomato cages couldn't contain them!
This was my first time growing tomatillos and my first thought when harvesting them was: So that's what they're supposed to be like! The tomatillos we get in the store in the northern states are often past their prime by the time they reach us. These are firm and fresh, with little to none of the sticky coating under the husk that you see with store-bought. I ended up canning most of my harvest as a tomatillo salsa.

Productive and delicious--needs support!

by

These are super productive plants. They did take quite a while to get started, and really only began to take off with late spring heat here in California 9b. But now we've got an endless supply of small, mostly about 1" tomatillos with delicious flavor. Mine tend to drop off the plant as they turn yellow, and I haven't seen the purple mottling in the photos for what its worth.

Worth noting: I agree with the other reviewer who notes the need for very good support or trellising! I neglected this at first and now am scrambling to tie up the plants mid summer. Early in the season they may look like they'll be able to support themselves, but by mid-summer the branches start to flop over--so make sure to stake or cage or otherwise trellis. That being said, they don't seem to mind very much and continue to pump out buckets of tiny tomatillos.