Black Krim Tomato

Solanum lycopersicum | SKU: 0662
5 Reviews
$3.25 to $27.50
  • Fruits are violet-brown and purple-red
  • Sun exposure darkens the color
  • Beefsteak tomatoes
  • Excellent flavor
  • Indeterminate - Fruit ripens throughout the season
  • 70-90 days from transplant
  • ±9,500 seeds/oz

$3.25 to $27.50

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Item Details

Also called Black Crimea and introduced to SSE by Lars Olov Rosenstrom of Sweden. Originally from the Crimean peninsula in the Black Sea. Beefsteak fruits are a unique combination of violet-brown and purple-red—they turn almost black with sufficient sunlight and heat. Excellent full flavor. Indeterminate, 70-90 days from transplant. ±9,500 seeds/oz.

Learn to Grow Black Krim Tomato

Start Indoors: 6 weeks before last frost

Germination: 7-14 Days

Plant Outdoors: 24-36” Apart

Support: Cage, stake, or trellis

Instructions - Sow seeds indoors ¼" deep. Tomatoes are sensitive to freezing temperatures, so wait to transplant outdoors until the soil is warm. Plant in full sun.

Ratings & Reviews

5 reviews

4.2

Great flavor

by

I really enjoy the flavor of this tomato. It is so good sliced on hamburgers. I did have some trouble with the fruit splitting, but I would blame that on my inexperience and a problem with our water line. The flavor is worth it, so I am trying it again this year.

Lovely flavor, may crack

by

Delicious flavor and beautiful looking, but they seem prone to cracking. Bit challenging to maintain the right moisture balance between dry spells and heavy rain in SE PA to prevent the cracks. Juicy and nice to cook with.

Sweet and Juicy! The best!

by

THE best tomatoes! Everyone loves these and raves about these. Very sweet and juicy and easy to grow.

A favorite for sure

by

Always loved this tomato. I grew it years ago and to this day people still ask me about it.

Going to try something else next season - PA zone 5

by

I found these to be inconsistent. The seedlings were a bit more finicky to start than the other varieties I grow. I found the fruit to be inconsistent. The bottom half of the tomato would be ready to harvest and the top portion was green and hard forcing me to either allow it to get ripe to the point of no flavor on the base of the fruit allowing the top to mature...or to cut and waste 1/3 of the fruit of so. Thinking it may just be related to my location, my Amish paste and others did well as always.